How to take good group pictures

how to take good group pictures

How to Take Great Group Photos (Best Composition, Poses & Lighting!)

A great group photo starts with composing the image. With large family pictures, it’s a good idea to head into the shot with the composition already in mind. This way, you won’t have to build the frame on the spot. Arranging a large group takes a significant amount of time. Take a lot of shots One of the biggest problems with group shots is someone blinking or not looking at the camera at the right time. The easiest way round this is to take multiple shots – try switching your camera to continuous shooting mode and firing short bursts of shots.

If you own a digital camera, and you're known for taking lots of pictures, then the chances are good that someone is going to ask you to take a group photo how to clean a circumcised baby boy a party or family gathering. This can be a daunting task as it comes with a certain amount of responsibility, and the potential for a bad picture can be higher than normal.

What if someone blinks? Are they all looking the same way? Did you get everyone in the frame? These problems, and more, are easily solved if you follow these simple tips. Many digital cameras today come with face priority autofocus. If your camera has this, then it is a good idea to turn it on for group photos.

It forces your camera to look for faces in your frame when it focuses. These systems can often detect multiple faces, and how to take good group pictures are a great way to ensure that your final image is sharp.

Lining people up in rows looks very formal, and it can be an easy way to lose someone's face behind a crowd of people. Keep it informal. If you can arrange your group around a prop like some furniture, or on a flight of stairs, your chances of a more memorable shot are increased. The ideal lens for portrait photography often falls in the mm category. At these focal lengths, you will minimize any distortion of your subjects' faces. A m macro prime is a popular choice, but so is a 50mm prime or a versatile m zoom.

These lenses will give you sharp, well-proportioned images with a smooth, blurred background if you need it. If you have a fixed lens camera, try to zoom out to this range to gain the same advantage. The problem with many group how to take good group pictures is that they often look too staged or forced.

Instead, talk to your group as you shoot. Start some banter, tell a few jokes, and before you know it, your subjects will be relaxed, and you will have a much more natural-looking image. Continue to shoot, and talk, until you have a variety of poses and images to choose from.

With large groups of people, you inevitably will get some images that would have been great, if only everybody had their eyes open. Taking multiple pictures is a great way to turn the odds back in your favor.

Some photographers even what is a c- spine to have everybody start with their eyes closed, and then open them on a count of 3. Set your camera on a tripod and use the live view preview to give you two free hands to direct and arrange your subjects.

When mounted on a tripod, checking how things look on the LCD screen can be quicker and easier than constantly lifting the camera up and down to your eye level. Using a tripod also gives you the option of setting the self timer and joining the group portrait yourself. Pick a smaller aperture like f8 or f11 and focus on the person who is closest to the camera.

In this way, you will get the depth of field you need to keep everyone sharp and in focus. If you have a compact camera and can't adjust your aperture, try the landscape scene mode. It will achieve the same effect.

Focus on the Face Many digital cameras today come with face priority autofocus. Strike a Pose Lining people up in rows looks very formal, and it can be an easy way to lose someone's face behind a crowd of people. Note: When you purchase something after clicking links in our articles, we may earn a small commission. Read how to take good group pictures affiliate link policy for more details. Related: Security Cameras Photography.

Focus on the Face

The problem with many group photos is that they often look too staged or forced. Instead, talk to your group as you shoot. Start some banter, tell a few jokes, and before you know it, your subjects.

One of the most common types of photography is the group photo. But group photos can be hard to get right. Taking a good group photo requires a little forward planning. If you have the opportunity scope out a good location beforehand. And finally, make sure that your camera is ready to shoot! The location for your group photo is often what will make or break the shot. Think about how to give your images context.

Using Artificial Intelligence, PortraitPro enhances every aspect of a portrait for beautifully natural results. A large group of people has enough going on without adding to that.

Try and pick a moment when the lighting is even, with no hard shadows falling on any of the group. One of the biggest problems with group shots is someone blinking or not looking at the camera at the right time. The easiest way round this is to take multiple shots — try switching your camera to continuous shooting mode and firing short bursts of shots. You will often find that people start to relax a few shots in naturally. A wide-angle lens makes it easier to get everyone in the shot, without you having to stand too far away.

It also means that you can get closer to your subjects and retain more detail in their faces. You can also try taking some head and shoulder shots if your group is a smaller one. Use an aperture of at least f11, or f16 for larger groups. This will mean that you have a large depth of field, but a smaller aperture and therefore less light. If necessary, up your ISO slightly to compensate for the lack of light.

This will prevent your subjects from having to squint into the sun. Whilst you will probably find that people will pose themselves to a certain extent naturally e. Make sure people are close together to help keep everyone in focus and to help give a sense of unity to the group. If particular people are the focus of a shot — say the bride and groom at a wedding, make sure they are the central focus point of the photograph and group everyone else around them.

You can also vary the shots by doing some where everyone is looking at the couple in question, as well as ones where everyone looks at the camera. And for variation in group photos, put taller members not only at the back of the group but centred with shorter people on either side of them as well.

Before you take a shot, look for any distracting details on each person. Hair in the face or an awkward hand placement, for example, can really distract from a decent shot. Large groups tend to loose interest in being photographed quite quickly — there are two many distractions from others in the group! So take your shots quickly and with minimum hassle. I find myself saying this on every group photo shoot as it helps people to avoid hiding behind someone else either by accident or design!

Jo Plumridge is a UK based photographer, writer and lecturer. She specializes in portrait, corporate and travel photography, and writes photography, travel and comedy pieces for magazines, websites and books. You can see some of her work at her website , or follow her on Twitter. Liked this post? Please share it:. Ready to seriously improve your photography? Join thousands of photographers Free presets and resources Articles and tutorials Exclusive deals and discounts.



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